AI Automotive Banking Events Media

Artificial intelligence and the challenge of trust

Artificial intelligence and the challenge of trust

What is the context that we’re building this technology for, and will it make people feel good, or is it a bit too invasive?

copyright by www.cio.co.nz

SwissCognitiveWe’re entering into a stage that anthropologist and futurist Professor Genevieve Bell described at Xerocon as ‘the fourth wave of industrialisation’, an era of cyber-physical systems – drones, robots and self-driving cars powered by artificial intelligence ().

As with any technology, artificial intelligence can have great benefits, but we need to be thoughtful about how it is deployed. One one hand, can automate tedious processes and remove the leg work from manual tasks. On the other hand, it can be used to be invasive and even manipulative.

If it’s very clearly positioned as serving your interests, this use of can be really positive – I think we’d all agree that recognising fraudulent behaviour on your bank account is a good thing. It can also be used in a negative way to manipulate you – such as recognising your political affiliations and swaying you to vote, or not to vote, or even to vote for a particular person or party.

The context of what we’re using technology for is more important than ever before. This is particularly true for .

is great for processing data in a way that humans can’t. It can do things at speed and at enormous scale. For example it can be used to recognise patterns and anomalies across data, which is very useful for predicting the cash flow of a business or automating aspects of accounting.

has many different applications – a simple one is in taking events of information in the real world and turning that into data. In a social context, an example is . You take a photo of your friends, upload it to social media and your friends are recognised and tagged to allow you to find them again easily.

In a business context, we can use to capture the information that’s on a receipt and turn that into data that we can use to automate a task – such as auto-completing online expense claims.

People tend to find the either really useful – when it’s in a fairly safe context like recognising a receipt – or quite creepy – when you take a picture of 100 people and the machine can identify everyone.

People tend to find the either really useful – when it’s in a fairly safe context like recognising a receipt – or quite creepy – when you take a picture of 100 people and the machine can identify everyone.

That’s where this idea of context and trust comes through and these are concepts we should be keeping front of mind when developing . What is the context that we’re building this technology for, and will it make people feel good, or is it a bit too invasive?[…]  

read more – copyright by www.cio.co.nz

  1. Timothy Rue

    @SwissCognitive Trust? Challenge? Is it a challenge of trust or a challenge of persisting with the tech… https://t.co/2ubeQ2NCvE

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.