News Research Solutions

Deep Neural Networks Are Helping Decipher How Brains Work

Neuroscientists are finding that Deep Neural Networks often criticized as “black boxes,” can be good models for the organization of living brains.

Neuroscientists are finding that deep-learning networks, often criticized as “black boxes,” can be good models for the organization of living brains.

Copyright by www.wired.com

SwissCognitive, AI, Artificial Intelligence, Bots, CDO, CIO, CI, Cognitive Computing, Deep Learning, IoT, Machine Learning, NLP, Robot, Virtual reality, learning IN THE WINTER of 2011, Daniel Yamins, a postdoctoral researcher in computational neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, would at times toil past midnight on his machine vision project. He was painstakingly designing a system that could recognize objects in pictures, regardless of variations in size, position, and other properties—something that humans do with ease. The system was a deep neural network, a type of computational device inspired by the neurological wiring of living brains.

“I remember very distinctly the time when we found a neural network that actually solved the task,” he said. It was 2 am, a tad too early to wake up his adviser, James DiCarlo, or other colleagues, so an excited Yamins took a walk in the cold Cambridge air. “I was really pumped,” he said.

It would have counted as a noteworthy accomplishment in alone, one of many that would make neural networks the darlings of technology over the next few years. But that wasn’t the main goal for Yamins and his colleagues. To them and other neuroscientists, this was a pivotal moment in the development of computational models for brain functions.

DiCarlo and Yamins, who now runs his own lab at Stanford University, are part of a coterie of neuroscientists using deep neural networks to make sense of the brain’s architecture. In particular, scientists have struggled to understand the reasons behind the specializations within the brain for various tasks. They have wondered not just why different parts of the brain do different things, but also why the differences can be so specific: Why, for example, does the brain have an area for recognizing objects in general but also for faces in particular? Deep neural networks are showing that such specializations may be the most efficient way to solve problems.

Similarly, researchers have demonstrated that the deep networks most proficient at classifying , music, and simulated scents have architectures that seem to parallel the brain’s auditory and olfactory systems. Such parallels also show up in deep nets that can look at a 2D scene and infer the underlying properties of the 3D objects within it, which helps to explain how biological perception can be both fast and incredibly rich. All these results hint that the structures of living neural systems embody certain optimal solutions to the tasks they have taken on.

These successes are all the more unexpected given that neuroscientists have long been skeptical of comparisons between brains and deep neural networks, whose workings can be inscrutable. “Honestly, nobody in my lab was doing anything with deep nets [until recently],” said the MIT neuroscientist Nancy Kanwisher. “Now, most of them are training them routinely.”

Deep Nets and Vision

Artificial neural networks are built with interconnecting components called perceptrons, which are simplified digital models of biological neurons. The networks have at least two layers of perceptrons, one for the input layer and one for the output. Sandwich one or more “hidden” layers between the input and the output and you get a “deep” neural network; the greater the number of hidden layers, the deeper the network.

Read more: www.wired.com

0 Comments

Leave a Reply