FAGMA Research

How Canada got so smart on artificial intelligence

Artificial Intelligence boosts efficiency for solar and wind

When the robots take over, lots of strange things are going to happen. Cars will drive themselves. Your smartphone may be able to say if that mole is cancer.

SwissCognitiveWhen the robots take over, lots of strange things are going to happen. Cars will drive themselves. Your smartphone may be able to say if that mole is cancer. The same device could order you noodles in Shanghai through instantaneous voice translation. Lots of truckers, dermatologists and phrase-book editors will need to find new work.

But possibly the strangest thing of all will be where the robots will be invented. High on the list of likely birthplaces is Toronto.

Yes, the city that can’t get a subway built or figure out public trash bins has sneakily become “the epicentre of ” and “one of the world’s foremost hubs for research and development.”

That’s according to Samsung, who would know: The Korean tech giant opened an lab in Toronto last spring. Google and Uber have done the same.

Just last week, the city’s status as an petri dish was cemented by two big announcements. The Canadian philanthropists Gerry Schwartz and Heather Reisman donated $100-million to establish a new “innovation centre” focused on at the University of Toronto.

Just two days later, U of T professor Geoffrey Hinton was given a share of the prestigious A.M. Turing Award for his pioneering work in .

Unbeknownst to most Canadians, Canada has arrived as a major player in one of the world’s most exciting new industries, flying mostly under the radar. The signs are now all around – including in the Silicon Valley brand names attached to the title of every other U of T computer science prof. (Dr. Hinton has a second job at Google, a common arrangement for the city’s academia.)

Less obvious is how we got here. PhD theses will be written on the subject soon enough. But the evidence on the public record suggests some answers.

Justin Trudeau’s Liberals have a theory, of course, and it has a fair bit to do with Justin Trudeau’s Liberals. When the Prime Minister announced roughly $230-million in funding for an “-Powered Supply Chains Supercluster” in Quebec last December, he beamed, “Today’s announcement is an important step toward making Canada an export and leader.”

Justin Trudeau’s Liberals have a theory, of course, and it has a fair bit to do with Justin Trudeau’s Liberals. When the Prime Minister announced roughly $230-million in funding for an “-Powered Supply Chains Supercluster” in Quebec last December, he beamed, “Today’s announcement is an important step toward making Canada an export and leader.”[…]

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3 Comments

  1. [BLU] room ® Lea Logan❄

    @SwissCognitive So we do play with them richt?

  2. [BLU] room ® Lea Logan❄

    @SwissCognitive less @cruel manufacturing jobs splice it up#### Aircanada lol

  3. Linda 🇺🇸

    @SwissCognitive Very good going Canada. ☺

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